Chevrolet

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Chevrolet Avalanche
MSRP: $36,975
Invoice Pricing: $34,456
MPG: 15 / 21
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Chevrolet Camaro
MSRP: $24,180
Invoice Pricing: $23,249
MPG: 19 / 30
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Chevrolet Captiva Sport
MSRP: $24,580
Invoice Pricing: $23,392
MPG: 22 / 28
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Chevrolet Colorado Crew Cab
MSRP: $25,015
Invoice Pricing: $23,805
MPG: 18 / 25
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Chevrolet Colorado Extended Cab
MSRP: $20,460
Invoice Pricing: $19,674
MPG: 18 / 25
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Chevrolet Colorado Regular Cab
MSRP: $18,205
Invoice Pricing: $17,509
MPG: 18 / 25
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Chevrolet Colorado Regular Cab & Chassis
MSRP: $20,480
Invoice Pricing: $19,693
MPG: 16 / 21
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Chevrolet Corvette
MSRP: $50,575
Invoice Pricing: $46,111
MPG: 16 / 26
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Chevrolet Cruze
MSRP: $25,695
Invoice Pricing: $24,700
MPG: 28 / 42
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Chevrolet Equinox
MSRP: $24,580
Invoice Pricing: $23,392
MPG: 22 / 32
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Chevrolet Express 1500 Cargo
MSRP: $26,315
Invoice Pricing: $24,543
MPG: 15 / 20
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Chevrolet Express 1500 Passenger
MSRP: $29,965
Invoice Pricing: $27,937
MPG: 13 / 18
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Chevrolet Express 2500 Cargo
MSRP: $27,820
Invoice Pricing: $25,942
MPG: 10 / 15
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Chevrolet Express 2500 Passenger
MSRP: $30,860
Invoice Pricing: $28,769
MPG: 11 / 17
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Chevrolet Express 3500 Cargo
MSRP: $31,140
Invoice Pricing: $29,030
MPG: 10 / 14
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Chevrolet Express 3500 Passenger
MSRP: $33,155
Invoice Pricing: $30,904
MPG: 11 / 17
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Chevrolet Express Commercial Cutaway
MSRP: $28,635
Invoice Pricing: $26,700
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Impala
MSRP: $27,535
Invoice Pricing: $26,600
MPG: 18 / 30
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Chevrolet Malibu
MSRP: $22,915
Invoice Pricing: $22,140
MPG: 25 / 37
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Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab
MSRP: $32,710
Invoice Pricing: $31,124
MPG: 20 / 23
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Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Extended Cab
MSRP: $27,735
Invoice Pricing: $26,398
MPG: 15 / 21
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Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Regular Cab
MSRP: $23,590
Invoice Pricing: $22,686
MPG: 15 / 21
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Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD Crew Cab
MSRP: $34,330
Invoice Pricing: $32,330
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD Extended Cab
MSRP: $32,325
Invoice Pricing: $30,445
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD Regular Cab
MSRP: $30,295
Invoice Pricing: $28,537
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Silverado 3500 HD Crew Cab
MSRP: $36,600
Invoice Pricing: $34,464
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Silverado 3500 HD Crew Cab &...
MSRP: $34,910
Invoice Pricing: $32,875
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Silverado 3500 HD Extended Cab
MSRP: $34,965
Invoice Pricing: $32,927
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Silverado 3500 HD Regular Cab
MSRP: $31,790
Invoice Pricing: $29,942
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Silverado 3500 HD Regular Cab &...
MSRP: $31,190
Invoice Pricing: $29,378
MPG: No data / No data
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Chevrolet Sonic
MSRP: $14,995
Invoice Pricing: $14,640
MPG: 29 / 40
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Chevrolet Spark
MSRP: $12,995
Invoice Pricing: $12,628
MPG: No data / 38
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Chevrolet Suburban 1500
MSRP: $43,540
Invoice Pricing: $40,562
MPG: 15 / 21
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Chevrolet Suburban 2500
MSRP: $45,150
Invoice Pricing: $42,059
MPG: 10 / 16
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Chevrolet Tahoe
MSRP: $40,075
Invoice Pricing: $37,339
MPG: 20 / 23
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Chevrolet Traverse
MSRP: $31,335
Invoice Pricing: $30,115
MPG: 17 / 24
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Chevrolet Volt
MSRP: $39,995
Invoice Pricing: $38,429
MPG: 95 / 93
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Chevrolet

"See the USA in Your Chevrolet." That's what popular songstress Dinah Shore sang back in the Fifties, when her TV show was sponsored by Chevrolet. Motherhood and apple pie, that's what Chevrolet was presumed to stand for in those heady postwar years. Chevrolet was a car practically synonymous with mainstream. Yet, the company made countless forays into stimulating automobiles over the years, from the 1957 Bel Air and the Sting Ray Corvette to the hot Impala SS and controversial Corvair.

Named for Louis Chevrolet, the Chevrolet Motor Company was organized in November 1911; but Louis soon departed and the company became part of General Motors. In 1917, Chevrolet produced an overhead-valve V-8, but that didn't last long. GM president Alfred P. Sloan initiated an era of efficiency, including, in 1927, "planned obsolescence." That meant introducing a new model and making it seem like the previous one just wasn't good enough anymore.

To counter Ford's new Model A, Chevrolet switched from four-cylinder to six-cylinder engines in 1929. A Suburban Carryall, considered the first all-steel wagon, debuted in 1935. Other wagons were still wood-bodied.

Right after World War II, Chevrolet was among the first to advertise on TV. A Bel Air pillarless hardtop coupe debuted in 1950, along with a two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission. Chevrolets got a boxy but handsome redesign for 1955, switching to sharp-pointed fins in the 1957 reworking that created avidly-coveted Bel Air hardtops and convertibles.

Few realized that a phenomenon was in store when Chevrolet launched the first Corvette in 1953, with a fiberglass body; six-cylinder engine, and Powerglide. Corvettes gained V-8 power in 1955, with a "Ramjet" fuel-injection option in 1957. That was good for 283 horsepower, which amounted to the elusive 1 horsepower (gross) per cubic-inch of displacement. Then came the Sting Ray generation in the early 1960s, highlighted by a shapely coupe with a split, wraparound back window.

Meanwhile, a new luxury Impala series emerged in 1958. Two years later, the big news was the compact Corvair, with an air-cooled, horizontally-opposed rear engine and a swing-axle rear suspension. That suspension troubled one safety advocate, Ralph Nader, who published his first book, Unsafe At Any Speed in 1965. A scathing critique of the auto industry with Corvair as prime offender, that book's safety message helped establish the consumer movement.

In 1962, a compact Chevy II with conventional engineering joined Chevrolet's lineup. In 1964, the midsize Chevelle appeared, soon serving as the foundation for a series of muscular machines.

In 1967, the Camaro, cousin to Pontiac's Firebird, debuted as a rival to Ford's Mustang. Soon, Z28 variants went on sale, comparable to Pontiac's Trans Ams, to help capture the youth market with its lust for power and speed. A totally restyled Corvette came in 1968, far less striking than the 1963-67 Sting Ray design. Two years later, the new Monte Carlo coupe wore the longest Chevrolet hood ever. Camaros were redone that year, adopting a larger, less nimble appearance.

Chevrolet joined the subcompact arena in 1971 with a new Vega, which soon earned disfavor due to body and engine problems. In 1973, a thousand Impalas got airbags, which wouldn't see general use until much later. GM's downsizing began in 1977, shrinking each Chevrolet model.

Compact Cavaliers joined for 1982, lasting until 2005. In 1985, Chevrolet launched the rear-drive Astro van-smaller than GM's full-size vans but larger than the new minivans from Chrysler.

Pickup trucks have long been part of the Chevrolet picture. The C/K models gave way to a new Silverado series for 1999. Compact S10 pickups were eventually replaced by the Colorado series of 2004. Minivans came along in 1990, starting with the Lumina and moving into the Venture, but that body style disappeared after 2008.

When Chevrolet issued its first conventional-looking subcompact in 1976, the Chevette, it had rear-wheel drive. Even a diesel engine was offered for a while. Subsequent subcompacts have been front-drive, as have most midsize and larger models. The tiny Metro began life as a Geo model (a separate brand), but then switched to a Chevrolet badge before its 2001 extinction. Chevrolet brought the subcompact Aveo from South Korea in 2004, replacing it for 2012 with an American-made Sonic. Similarly, the compact Cobalt gave way to a comparably-sized Cruze for 2011. On the midsize front, Chevrolet has offered a succession of Malibus, some with hybrid powertrains, along with the larger Impala.

Immense Suburbans and Tahoes have been mainstays for many years. Smaller SUVs and, later, crossovers have arrived at Chevrolet dealerships over the past decade, including the TrailBlazer, Equinox, and Traverse. An occasional curiosity also has attracted a certain following, including the big Avalanche SUV/pickup and the racy 2003-06 SSR, a small pickup with a retractable roof. Also unique is the compact HHR, built to look like a scaled-down panel truck of the past.

Top performer of the early 1990s was the ZR1 Corvette, packing a 375-horsepower V-8. Camaros disappeared after 2002, but a retro-look Camaro re-emerged as a 2010 model. Next up for Chevrolet is the Spark microcar, coming as a 2013 model. During 2012, Chevrolet also will be launching a super-hot limited-edition Camaro ZL1.